Ianos Rafael: The Human Presence

This series is composed of photos in which light, shadow and the human presence are predominant. Small fragments of objects, body parts and gestures combine with abundant light and dazzling darkness to create a simple moment or a unique sensation. They are everyday street scenes that we all see but in our daily rush they are overlooked and we forget to value them. This focus represents an attraction to simplicity, natural and indistinct things, emotions and invisible connections between people and the surroundings. This is a broad series, with no boundaries, just small pieces combined to create a specific feeling.

Ianos Rafael. I live in Bucharest, Romania and about four years ago I fell in love with photography. Since then I have expressed myself more in pictures than in words. For me, photography is like a bookmark for life, I can always come back to a point of time and feeling. Due to my desire to learn more, I got to know other photography enthusiasts, with whom in 2014 we founded BULB: the Bucharest Urban League of Photographers from the Balkans. The Bulb Collective consists of photographers active in urban (and rural) photography with an expressive shift to include highly aesthetic and poetic images in their assignments. Our work can be seen on: http://www.bulbphotos.eu. My work can be seen on: http://www.rafaelianos.ro/#1

God’s Books: Interview with the Vampire

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Mohab Nasr, Ya rabb, a’tina kutuban linaqra’ (Please, God, give us books to read), Cairo: Al Ain, 2012

“Any pretence of having specific reasons to stop writing poetry at one point or to return to it at another will be a fabrication,” says Mohab Nasr (b. 1962). “All I can say for sure is that I was surrounded by friends who used up my energy in conversations, which gave me a sense of reassurance of a certain kind, the extent of whose hazardousness it took a long time to realise.”
Thus the seemingly eternal vicious circle, perhaps even more pronounced outside Cairo, the underground literary centre of operations—in Alexandria, where, after a stint in said centre in the mid-1990s that cost him his government schoolteaching post, Nasr was living again:
To write, you have to have a reader; but, being a serious poet in late 20th-century Egypt, your reader can only be a fellow writer; you might as well just talk with them at the cafe—and, beyond an inevitably skewed sense of personal fulfillment, what on earth in the end could be the point of that?

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