Fabrizio Nacciareti: The Dark Side

Fabrizio Nacciareti, born in Rome in 1981, graduated from the Higher Institute of Photography and Integrated Communication there. His early work involved travel and geographic reportage. Later he pursued social photography, looking for stories and figures out of the collective imaginary. In 2009 he joined”OnOff Picture”, an Italian agency of photojournalism and reportage. He has since collaborated with the most important Italian and international magazines. He is currently a freelance photographer, based in Rome.

Sujith Nambiar: Mumbai-Doha-Mumbai

A user experience/product designer by trade, I am a self-taught contemporary Indian artist and photographer, actively seeking multi-dimensional conditions and emotions through my photographs. Initially photography was a newfound medium into which to channel my creative energy alongside painting. I have been engaged in street photography since 2013, capturing moments from the streets without any predefined purpose or set agenda.

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“Photography Is My Therapist”: the iPhone Photo World of Ornella Mignella

“I am not a photographer,” says the Italy-based Ornella Mignella, known on Instagram as @miss_golightly_the_cat and otherwise very reticent about herself. “Photography is my therapist. It helps me to accept myself and what happens to me. Acceptance is not resignation but a form of consciousness raising, an instantaneous clarity of thought captured in a picture. I use my iPhone 5 and some apps to edit my photos.”


Peter never came back

I play the role of Wendy, who waits for Peter Pan until her death. She lies on the floor, we don’t know if she tries to fly to reach Peter or dies of missing him. Her death is every existential failure, it is my generation’s failure, our broken dreams. Peter is everything we can’t reach, something we lost forever.
We only know that he flew away with Tinker Bell. Wendy flew away too.

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Shebin and its People: Mini Exhibition by Shereen Muhamed (@cheiroche)

Follow @cheiroche on Instagram; see cheiroche.tumblr.com

Youssef Rakha: The Strange Case of the Novelist from Egypt

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About mid-way through his Nobel Prize lecture, read by Mohamed Salmawy at the Swedish Academy in 1988, the acknowledged father of the Arabic novel Naguib Mahfouz (1911-2006) made the point that Europeans “may be wondering: This man coming from the third world, how did he find the peace of mind to write stories?” It’s a remark that has remained with me, not so much because it implies, absurdly, that no one from a third-world country is supposed to have either peace or mind enough for literature—it particularly annoys me when, addressing his European audience, Mahfouz goes on to say they’re “perfectly right” to be posing that question—but because this presumption of deprivation or lack, of writing being something over and above ordinary living and working, seems in a way to underlie the Egyptian novelist’s collective self-image. And, especially now that Egypt is barely surviving institutional collapse and civil conflict—something that despite war, regime change, and the turn of the millennium, never happened during the 94 years of Mahfouz’s life—as a person who lives in Cairo and writes novels in Arabic, it is an idea I am somehow expected to have about myself.

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بيت أروى: مهاب نصر عن الصدق والثورة

EGYPT. Fayoum. Tunis.

Bieke Depoorter, Fayoum. Source: magnumphotos.com

ليس أخطر ما أنتجته ثورة يوليو (أو انقلاب يوليو) هو ما يسمى بـ”حكم العسكر”، بل في كونها مثلت أو تسببت بوضوح في إحداث شرخ واسع في الضمير المصري. لأنها أولا أول سلطة “مصرية” تحتكر الحكم بلا منازع (فلا ملك ولا إنجليز)، ومن ثم فقد كانت تمهيدا لمواجهة الشعب لذاته وإن استغرقت هذه المواجهة عقودا خصيلتها ما يحدث الآن. ولأن هذه السلطة لم تحتكر الحكم باعتبارها سلطة منتخبة بل استثنائية، وهو ما جعل فكرة “الاستثناء” تتحول إلى قاعدة سياسية بشكل متناقض تماما مع طبيعتها. وهي ثالثا احتكرت تمثيل الضمير العام (المبرر  لهذه الاستثنائية) وبالتالي وضعت نفسها أمام شرط مستحيل وزائف.

استمر في القراءة

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