… behemoth beards bereft of all mustachios

And then the baby begins to sway. The ghost whirr of the AC dying hard in our ears, we’ve grown paralytically hot in the living room, some whiff of something gunpowder-like coming through the window, and all of life suddenly, wrongfully without power. Somewhere not far mephitic men with weapons must be raising those black flags marked with the statement of the faith in white rudimentary abjad, behemoth beards bereft of all mustachios, shrieking their support for the President of the Second Republic. Before long, enraged guevaras will be heading straight for the fuckers. They will be wielding slogans as they die of what, through rev-o-lution, they have brought upon themselves. The streets are quiet except for gun shots sounding a slow beat when the baby slithers off her mother’s lap and crawls to the center of the room, quarreling with balance and gravity until, plump legs ending in all but edible feet in two arches across a few square inches of the carpet, she is sitting. Her miniature fists grab invisible parallel bars as she rocks to and fro, up and down, shaking her head along the opposite axis and humming a crude rhythm in the candlelight. When she notices us notice her, she gathers speed. While she sways she is neither crying nor laughing her high, raucous laugh, the one that comes with a flurry and directionless shaking of the limbs. Now, as she rocks with martial regularity, her face is dead serious. This is evidently a matter of great importance; it must be done in a professional spirit. And then the father too rises, finally, wading in the humidity to the nearest flat surface, a closed door, where he manages to stand. And, taking my cue from a gun shot, my wife clapping along with me, the baby like a pendulum while Egypt burns, I begin to drum.

From Waiting for Civil War: an iPhoneography work in progress

2013-09-09 21.33.34


2013-09-11 18.50.15

Continue reading

On Fiction and the Caliphate

wpid-ysf-2013-01-10-18-54.jpg

.

Map of Cairo as tugra or Ottoman sultan’s seal

Towards the end of 2009, I completed my first novel, whose theme is contemporary Muslim identity in Egypt and, by fantastical extension, the vision of a possible khilafa or caliphate. I was searching for both an alternative to nationhood and a positive perspective on religious identity as a form of civilisation compatible with the post-Enlightenment world. The closest historical equivalent I could come up with, aside from Muhammad Ali Pasha’s abortive attempt at Ottoman-style Arab empire (which never claimed to be a caliphate as such), was the original model, starting from the reign of Sultan-Caliph Mahmoud II in 1808. I was searching for Islam as a post-, not pre-nationalist political identity, and the caliphate as an alternative to the postcolonial republic, with Mahmoud and his sons’ heterodox approach to the Sublime State and their pan-Ottoman modernising efforts forming the basis of that conception. Such modernism seemed utterly unlike the racist, missionary madness of European empire. It was, alas, too little too late.

Continue reading

Hani Shukrallah’s J’accuse

Muslim brotherhood military man in Egypt مؤسس ...
Image via Wikipedia
J’accuse
Hani Shukrallah , Saturday 1 Jan 2011
Hypocrisy and good intentions will not stop the next massacre. Only a good hard look at ourselves and sufficient resolve to face up to the ugliness in our midst will do so

We are to join in a chorus of condemnation. Jointly, Muslims and Christians, government and opposition, Church and Mosque, clerics and laypeople – all of us are going to stand up and with a single voice declare unequivocal denunciation of al-Qaeda, Islamist militants, and Muslim fanatics of every shade, hue and color; some of us will even go the extra mile to denounce salafi Islam, Islamic fundamentalism as a whole, and the Wahabi Islam which, presumably, is a Saudi import wholly alien to our Egyptian national culture.

And once again we’re going to declare the eternal unity of “the twin elements of the nation”, and hearken back the Revolution of 1919, with its hoisted banner showing the crescent embracing the cross, and giving symbolic expression to that unbreakable bond.

Much of it will be sheer hypocrisy; a great deal of it will be variously nuanced so as keep, just below the surface, the heaps of narrow-minded prejudice, flagrant double standard and, indeed, bigotry that holds in its grip so many of the participants in the condemnations.

All of it will be to no avail. We’ve been here before; we’ve done exactly that, yet the massacres continue, each more horrible than the one before it, and the bigotry and intolerance spread deeper and wider into every nook and cranny of our society. It is not easy to empty Egypt of its Christians; they’ve been here for as long as there has been Christianity in the world. Close to a millennium and half of Muslim rule did not eradicate the nation’s Christian community, rather it maintained it sufficiently strong and sufficiently vigorous so as to play a crucial role in shaping the national, political and cultural identity of modern Egypt.

Yet now, two centuries after the birth of the modern Egyptian nation state, and as we embark on the second decade of the 21stcentury, the previously unheard of seems no longer beyond imagining: a Christian-free Egypt, one where the cross will have slipped out of the crescent’s embrace, and off the flag symbolizing our modern national identity. I hope that if and when that day comes I will have been long dead, but dead or alive, this will be an Egypt which I do not recognize and to which I have no desire to belong.

I am no Zola, but I too can accuse. And it’s not the blood thirsty criminals of al-Qaeda or whatever other gang of hoodlums involved in the horror of Alexandria that I am concerned with.

I accuse a government that seems to think that by outbidding the Islamists it will also outflank them.

I accuse the host of MPs and government officials who cannot help but take their own personal bigotries along to the parliament, or to the multitude of government bodies, national and local, from which they exercise unchecked, brutal yet at the same time hopelessly inept authority.

I accuse those state bodies who believe that by bolstering the Salafi trend they are undermining the Muslim Brotherhood, and who like to occasionally play to bigoted anti-Coptic sentiments, presumably as an excellent distraction from other more serious issues of government.

But most of all, I accuse the millions of supposedly moderate Muslims among us; those who’ve been growing more and more prejudiced, inclusive and narrow minded with every passing year.

I accuse those among us who would rise up in fury over a decision to halt construction of a Muslim Center near ground zero in New York, but applaud the Egyptian police when they halt the construction of a staircase in a Coptic church in the Omranya district of Greater Cairo.

I’ve been around, and I have heard you speak, in your offices, in your clubs, at your dinner parties: “The Copts must be taught a lesson,” “the Copts are growing more arrogant,” “the Copts are holding secret conversions of Muslims”, and in the same breath, “the Copts are preventing Christian women from converting to Islam, kidnapping them, and locking them up in monasteries.”

I accuse you all, because in your bigoted blindness you cannot even see the violence to logic and sheer common sense that you commit; that you dare accuse the whole world of using a double standard against us, and are, at the same time, wholly incapable of showing a minimum awareness of your own blatant double standard.

And finally, I accuse the liberal intellectuals, both Muslim and Christian who, whether complicit, afraid, or simply unwilling to do or say anything that may displease “the masses”, have stood aside, finding it sufficient to join in one futile chorus of denunciation following another, even as the massacres spread wider, and grow more horrifying.

A few years ago I wrote in the Arabic daily Al-Hayat, commenting on a columnist in one of the Egyptian papers. The columnist, whose name I’ve since forgotten, wrote lauding the patriotism of an Egyptian Copt who had himself written saying that he would rather be killed at the hands of his Muslim brethren than seek American intervention to save him.

Addressing myself to the patriotic Copt, I simply asked him the question: where does his willingness for self-sacrifice for the sake of the nation stop. Giving his own life may be quite a noble, even laudable endeavor, but is he also willing to give up the lives of his children, wife, mother? How many Egyptian Christians, I asked him, are you willing to sacrifice before you call upon outside intervention, a million, two, three, all of them?

Our options, I said then and continue to say today are not so impoverished and lacking in imagination and resolve that we are obliged to choose between having Egyptian Copts killed, individually or en masse, or run to Uncle Sam. Is it really so difficult to conceive of ourselves as rational human beings with a minimum of backbone so as to act to determine our fate, the fate of our nation?

That, indeed, is the only option we have before us, and we better grasp it, before it’s too late.

Enhanced by Zemanta

Longlist Announced for International Prize for Arabic Fiction 2011

 

عنوان الرواية

إسم المؤلف

إصدار

الجنسية

القوس والفراشة

محمد الأشعري

المركز الثقافي العربي

مغربي

البيت الأندلسي

واسيني الأعرج

منشورات الجمل

جزائري

رقصة شرقية

خالد البري

دار العين للنشر

مصري

صائد اليرقات

أمير تاج السر

ثقافة للنشر

سوداني

عين الشمس

ابتسام إبراهيم تريسي

دار مسعى

سورية

حياة قصيرة

رينيه الحايك

المركز الثقافي العربي

لبنانية

جنود الله

فواز حداد

شركة رياض الريس للكتب والنشر

سوري

حبل سري

مها حسن

الكوكب

سورية

معذبتي

بنسالم حميش

دار الشروق

مغربي

اسطاسية

خيري أحمد شلبي

دار الشروق

مصري

بروكلين هايتس

ميرال الطحاوي

دار ميريت

مصرية

طوق الحمام

رجاء عالم

المركز الثقافي العربي

سعودية

فتنة جدة

مقبول موسى العلوي

الكوكب

سعودي

الخطايا الشائعة

فاتن المر

دار النهار

لبنانية

نساء الريح

رزان نعيم المغربي

ثقافة للنشر

ليبية

اليهودي الحالي

علي المقري

دار الساقي

يمني

 

www.arabicfiction.org

  • · Seven women make the longlist of 16, the highest number in the Prize’s history
  • · Religious extremism, political and social conflict and women’s struggles emerge as key themes

The Judges of the International Prize for Arabic Fiction 2011 today, Thursday 11 November 2010, announce the longlist contenders for the Prize, one of the most prestigious and important literary events of its kind in the Arab world .

The judging panel whittled down the longlist of 16 from a total of 123 entries, from 17 countries across the Arab world. They included for the first time this year, Afghanistan. The highest number of submissions came from Egypt. The number of submissions is up on the previous prize year, when 118 titles were entered from 17 countries. 29% of the works submitted were by female writers, compared with 16% the previous year.

The longlisted titles range from a woman’s account of the underbelly of present day Mecca to a story of Ottoman nationalism at the end of the 19th century and a tale of star-crossed teenage lovers in the Yemen. There are two novels about fathers whose sons join Al-Qaeda, whilst another looks at the ordeal of a prisoner in an American prison in Morocco. The struggle of the Arab expatriate in Western society is the focus of two novels, both in the UK and in America. This year sees solid representation from North Africa.

The list features four authors previously nominated for IPAF, for the 2009 Prize: Fawaz Haddad, shortlisted for The Unfaithful Translator and longlist contenders Renée Hayek, Ali Al-Muqri and Bensalem Himmich for Prayer for the Family, Black Taste, Black Odour and The Man from Andalucia respectively.

The 2011 longlist is, with author names in alphabetical order:

Title Author Publisher Nationality
The Arch and the Butterfly Mohammed Achaari Al-Markaz al-Thaqafi al-Arabi (Arab Cultural Centre) Moroccan
The Doves’ Necklace Raja Alem Al-Markaz al-Thaqafi al-Arabi (Arab Cultural Centre) Saudi Arabian
Turmoil in Jeddah Maqbul Moussa Al-Alawi Al-Kawkab 

Saudi Arabian
An Oriental Dance Khalid Al-Bari El-Ain Publishing Egyptian
God’s Soldiers Fawaz Haddad Riad El-Rayyes Books Syrian
Secret Rope Maha Hassan Al-Kawkab Syrian
A Short Life Renée Hayek Al-Markaz al-Thaqafi al-Arabi (Arab Cultural Centre) Lebanese
My Tormentor Bensalem Himmich Dar El Shorouk Moroccan
The Andalucian House Waciny Laredj Jamal Publications 

Algeria
Women of Wind Razan Naim Al-Maghrabi Thaqafa l-al-Nashr (Cultural Publications) Libyan
The Handsome Jew Ali Al-Muqri Dar al-Saqi Yemeni
Common Sins Fatin Al-Murr Dar An-Nahar Lebanon
Istasia Khairy Shalaby Dar El Shorouk Egyptian
The Hunter of the Chrysalises (or The Head Hunter) Amir Taj Al-Sir Thaqafa l-al-Nashr (Cultural Publications) Sudanese
Brooklyn Heights Miral Al-Tahawy Dar Merit Egyptian
The Eye of the Sun Ibtisam Ibrahim Teresa Arab Scientific Publishers Syria

The Chair of Judges commented on the longlist: “This year’s novels were thematically varied, covering the issues of religious extremism, political and social conflict, and women’s struggle to liberate themselves from the obstacles standing in the way of their personal growth and empowerment. We are delighted with the very high percentage of women who reached the longlist compared with previous years.”

The 2011 Panel of Judges will be revealed at the same time as the 2011 shortlist announcement is made on 9 December 2010 in Doha, Qatar, the 2010 Arab Capital of Culture.

Joumana Haddad, Prize Administrator, commented on the longlist: “The Prize in its fourth year has become a critical conscience and a literary reference in all that relates to the modern Arabic novel, in both the Arab and Western worlds. The 2011 longlist is proof of that.”

2011 marks the fourth year of the Prize, the first of its kind in the Arab world in its commitment to the independence, transparency and integrity of its selection process. Its aim is to celebrate the very best of contemporary Arabic fiction and encourage wider international readership of Arabic literature through translation.

To date, the three winners of the Prize have been translated into English, in addition to a range of other languages including Bosnian, French, German, Norwegian and Indonesian. Bahaa Taher’s Sunset Oasis (2008) was translated into English by Sceptre (an imprint of Hodder & Stoughton) in 2009, Youssef Ziedan’s Azazel(2009) will be published in the UK by Atlantic Books in August 2011 and news of an English translation of Abdo Khal’s Spewing Sparks as Big as Castles (2010) will be announced shortly. In addition, a number of the shortlisted finalists have also secured translations, the most recent of which is an English translation of Inaam Kachachi’s The American Granddaughter through the Bloomsbury Qatar Foundation.

Jonathan Taylor, Chair of the Board of Trustees, commented: “The longlist for the fourth International Prize for Arabic Fiction is as varied, talented and powerful as ever and includes writers from seven Arabic countries, a high proportion being women.”

The International Prize for Arabic Fiction is awarded for prose fiction in Arabic and each of the six shortlisted finalists receives $10,000, with a further $50,000 going to the winner.  It was launched in Abu Dhabi, UAE, in April 2007, and is supported by the Booker Prize Foundation and the Emirates Foundation for Philanthropy.

The winner of the International Prize for Arabic Fiction 2011 will be announced at the awards ceremony in Abu Dhabi on Monday 14 March 2011, the eve of the Abu Dhabi International Book Fair.

Enhanced by Zemanta

حديث محمد فرج في السفير

Ibn Arabi (Arabic: ابن عربي) (July 28, 1165-No...
Image via Wikipedia

محمد فرج: ما يكتبه ليس أدب رحلات ولكنه سياحة روحية في الأماكن

يوسف رخا: ما يسمّونه الانفجار الروائي أنتج كتابات لا تمتّ للجنس الروائي

استطاع يوسف رخا أن يصنع شكلاً جديداً ومغايراً لأدب الرحلات عبر ثلاثة كتب، صدر أحدثها مؤخراً تحت عنوان «شمال القاهرة، غرب الفلبين.. أسفار في العالم العربي» عن دار رياض الريس للكتب والنشر. بدأ مشروع يوسف رخا مع بيروت عندما قام بزيارتها في الذكرى الثلاثين للحرب الأهلية وكتب كتابه الاول «بيروت شي محل» 2006، بعد بيروت كانت رحلته إلى تونس ثم كتابه «بورقيبة على مضض..عشرة أيام في تونس» 2008 ثم الكتاب الأخير الذي شمل رحلات عدة الى المغرب وتونس ولبنان والامارات وايضاً القاهرة. عبر لغة متوترة ذات جمل قصيرة تلغرافية، تقدّم قراءة للمكان ولتاريخه القديم وحالته الآنية وايضاً ترصد حالة الرواي الذي هو مصري او عربي يلتقي بعرب آخرين لتظهر من خلال هذا اللقاء أسئلة كثيرة تشغل يوسف عبر كتبه الثلاثة أسئلة متعلقة بالهوية والقومية والشتات العربي والتاريخ وكيفية رؤيتنا الحالية له وايضاً كيفية تعاملنا اليومي معه.
يوسف لجأ الى هذا الشكل الكتابي مللاً من حصر أدبية الكتابة في الرواية والقصة والشعر واعتبار أي كتابة غير روائية هي كتابة غير أدبية، وبالتالي أقل شأناً، ولكنه يعكف الآن على كتابة رواية. وقرر أن «شمال القاهرة، غرب الفلبين» هو آخر ما سيكتبه بهذا الشكل فقد استنفده ولن يأتي فيه بجديد.
بداية.. ماذا تعني لك كتابة المكان؟
لا أحب استعمال تعبير «كتابة مكان» فهو تعبير نقدي وليس تصنيفاً أدبياً، بالنسبة لي ليس الامر في الكتابة عن المكان قدر. هو تجاوز على قدسية «النص الادبي». فما أكتبه ليس قصة ولا شعراً وليس رواية. نص لا يحمل إدعاء روائياً أو قصصياً ولكن في الوقت ذاته أدباً.
وربما تكون تجربتي مختلفة بعض الشيء. ففي البداية كنت اكتب قصصاً ونُشرت في كتاب «أزهار الشمس» 1999 ولكن لم أكن أعرف ساعتها أني لا بد ان أكون خادماً لكتابي وأحمله وأطوف به على الصحف وعلى النقاد والكتاب كي أعرفهم بنفسي، كنت أتصوّر ان النشر كفيل بأن يجعل المهتمين يقرأون ويتفاعلون. وقد تزامن هذا مع الوقت الذي بدأت فيه العمل في الصحافة وتحديداً في «الاهرام ويكلي» في وقت ضمت الجريدة عدداً من الشخصيات خلقت مناخاً مغايراً للعمل وفتحت فيه مساحات جديدة للكتابة وإمكانيات للظهور.
ولم أكن أتعامل مع الصحافة كمجرد «أكل عيش» أو كعمل تافه. كنت أمارسها بشيء من الحب والاهتمام ولم أكن أضع ذلك الفارق بين «الأدبي» المهم و«الصحفي» الأقل أهمية. فانشغلت بذلك لفترة طويلة تقريباً ست سنوات. ولما كنت أيضاً أعمل في الصحافة الثقافية، وبالتالى كنت متابعاً للحياة الثقافية وكنت أشعر بالملل من فكرة الانفجار الروائي التي بدأت في تلك الفترة، كنت أشعر ان هذا الحديث كله كان يجب أن يدور حول حركة التسعينيات الشعرية التي حققت منجزاً بالفعل.
ثم جاء «بيروت شي محل»؟
خلال الفترة التي أتحدث عنها بدأت مجلة «أمكنة» في الصدور. التي تقوم بالأساس على الاعتماد على كتابة خارجة عن التصنيف الادبي، وعندما ذهبت إلى بيروت في الذكرى الثلاثين للحرب الاهلية في 2005 كان من المفترض أني سأكتب مقالاً صغيراً لأمكنة»، ولكن وجدت المقال ينمو معي اذ فتح معي طرقاً جديدة تحمل أسئلة كثيرة لها علاقة بالكتابة من ناحية وبفكرة «الهوية» من ناحية أخرى. فكان «بيروت.. شي محل» ثم «بورقيبة على مضض» 2008 والكتاب الصادر مؤخراً «شمال القاهرة غرب الفلبين»، والذي ضم مجموعة رحلات حدثت خلال فترة الكتابين السابقين.
كتابتك من الصعب تصنيفها كأدب رحلات تقليدي أو سيرة ذاتية او رواية كيف تراها أنت وكيف ترى كيفية استقبال القارئ لها؟؟
في البداية كنت أصنف ما أكتبه أنه أدب رحلات، وبعد كتاب تونس وجدت أيضاً أنه خارج تصنيف أدب الرحلات بشكل ما. بالنسبة للقارئ هناك شكل ما من الخدعة فأنا أقدم هذا على أنه أدب رحلات وللقارئ حر في كيفية التعامل معه.
ابراهيم فرغلي عندما تناول كتابي الأخير ذكر ان ما أكتبه ليس أدب رحلات فهو لا يضيف الى معلومات القارئ شيئاً جديداً عن المكان، ولكنه نوع من السياحة الروحية في الاماكن!! وهو تقريباً عكس ما أقصد تماماً. لقد كنت سعيداً بكلمة الغلاف الخلفي لـ «شرق القاهرة غرب الفلبين»، لأنه يذكر ببساطة انه كتاب عن رحلات الى عدة مدن عربية.
الطرح الذي تقدّمه كتابتي بالأساس هو طرح يبتعد عن فكرة انك تكتب قصة قصيرة او رواية ولا تودّ حتى الاقتراب من هذا العالم. انت تكتب كتابة أدبية بعيدة عن المفاهيم الميتافيزيقية لسياحة الروح من ناحية وأيضاً عن الانواع الادبية المعروفة. ما اريد ان اقوله ان هذه الكتابة تتجاوز وترفض فكرة ان الادب او النص الادبي اعلى من النص الصحفي على سبيل المثال او الرسالة التي يمكن ان يتبادلها الاصدقاء. فالأدب ليس تعالياً او مجرد شكل من أشكال التصنيف تضفي قداسة على شكل وتلغيها عن أشكال أخرى.
لقد دفعت نقوداً من اجل ان انشر قصصي ولكن لم يهتم بها أحد. بينما في الصحافة تم الاحتفاء بي وتقدير ما أكتبه بشكل لم يصنعه النشر التقليدي. وانا لا أعرف كيف ستكون شكل الحياة بعد خمسين سنة هل ستبقى الناس تقرأ كتباً مثلاً أم ستتوقف هذه العادة. لا أحبّ فكرة الخلود الادبي.
فأنا أريد ان يتم الاحتفاء بعملي وانا على قيد الحياة وان اشعر ان هناك من يهتم بعملي بالدرجة التي ترضيني.
وبالنسبة لي اظن هناك ثلاثة مستويات عندما أتعامل مع ما أكتب المستوى السياحي او المفهوم الغربي لأدب الرحلات كمشاهدات وهناك مستوى آخر يرتبط بفكرة الهوية الذي يطرح نفسه بقوة طوال الوقت.. سؤال أن تكون عربياً؟؟ فهل نحن عرب، لأننا نتكلم في هذا الفضاء الواسع المسمّى اللغة العربية؟
وايضاً هناك المستوى التاريخي وهو المستوى الاهم والتاريخ هنا بمعنى ما يروى عن المكان، وهو ما يفرض الكتابة عن المكان، فكلمة «يُروى عن» يأتي بعدها مكان أو شخص أو سرد عنك؟
أعتقد ان دخول السيرة الذاتية ليست شيئاً مقصوداً بقدر ما هو جزء من طريقتي في الكتابة، وليس محركاً لي للكتابة. ولم أسع حتى الآن الى التخلص منها.
الفكرة بالأساس هي بمنهج الصحافة نفسها. يوجد حدث ثقافي وأنا كصحافي ذاهب لتغطيته فتسافر وتشاهد وتتأثر وتتحدث مع أكبر عدد ممكن من الناس وتجمع مشاهداتك وأحاديثك وتكتب عن كل هذا. وحقق ذلك بالنسبة لي توازناً بعيداً عن المناخ الأدبي الذي كنت أراه قاتماً وسخيفاً. وكانت «أمكنة» بالنسبة لي تفتح طريقاً مبشراً للخروج من هذا السخف والقتامة.
بيروت ـ تونس
كيــف كانــت تجربــة الكتابــة عــن تونــس بعد «بيروت شي محل»؟
كتاب بيروت بالطبع كان أكثر انطلاقاً أو فطرية. «بورقيبة على مضض» كان يحمل خبرة عملية أكثر بهذا الشكل الكتابي. فعلى حد تعبير كل من ايمان مرسال وعلاء خالد أن كتاب تونس فيه تعمّد في الكتابة. وانا أظن ان قراءة الكتابين معا مهمة فهناك الكثير من خطوط التشابه والارتباط كما هو حاصل ايضاً من وجهة نظري بين بيروت وتونس على مستوى انتقال الفلسطينيين من بيروت الى تونس. وانتقال الفينيقيين من بيروت الى تونس. وانتقالي شخصياً بين المدينتين.
وقد استغرقت عملية كتابة «بورقيبة على مضض» وقتاً أطول حيث استعملت أساليب متعددة واستخدمت وسائل أكثر.
ومن ناحية أخرى لم تكن مادة تونس مثيرة مثل مادة و«كتابة بيروت شي محل» بيروت بالفعل حركت أشياء كثيرة بداخلي. تونس أيضاً وضعتني أمام أسئلة كثيرة متعلقة بالعروبة وباللغة وعلى مستوى التدين أيضاً فهناك في تونس تدين أكثر من مصر، ولكن الأقل هو مظاهر هذا التدين التي تغلب في مصر.
على الرغم من التشابه بين تاريخي مصر وتونس. فالتاريخ التونسي هو تاريخ مصغر لمصر باستثناء أن ناصر مات وبورقيبة تمّ عزله وهذا كان أمراً مثيراً. بالنسبة لي هذه المقارنة بين مشاريع ناصر وبورقيبة وأيها لا زال يعمل وأيها توقف عن العمل وعن إنتاج النتائج. لكن لبنان حالة أكثر عنفاً وتعقيداً. وكان لدي في رحلة بيروت هدف واضح وهو أن أفهم «الحرب الأهلية» بالتأكيد لم أفهمها ولكن هذا الهدف كان موجوداً وهو ما سهّل الكتابة، رحلة تونس جعلتني أكثر حيرة.
لكن سفرك لبيروت لم يكن هو الأول، فدراستك الجامعية كانت في إنكلترا… لماذا لم تكتب عن هذه الفترة؟
اعتقد ان الكتابة عن المكان مرتبطة بقرب المساحة الزمنية لرؤية المكان، لان الامر يتحول الى ذاكرة للمكان. وهنا تتحول الى كتابة ذكرياتك عن المكان… الأمر الذي يجعل الكتابة عن الذاكرة وليس عن المكان. ولكني لم أحاول ان أكتب من قبل عن فترة إقامتي بانكلترا وهو ما يلفت انتباهي هذه الأيام، ربما لأني لست مشغولا منذ البداية بالغرب. لكن العدد المقبل من «أمكنة» سيكون حول الجامعة وسأشترك به بمقال عن هذه الفترة وهذا سيكون أول كتابة عن هذه الفترة.
ما اقصده بالمساحة الزمنية هو الابتعاد الزمني عن زمن الرحلة فرحلتي إلى انكلترا كانت من 1995 الى 1998 مر تقريباً عشر سنين. وهو الامر الذي سيجعل كتابتي عنها مختلفة بالتأكيد عن كتابة رحلتي بيروت وتونس فالإقامة الطويلة في المكان تصنع شيئاً مختلفاً وتحتاج إلى صياغة مختلفة. فالنص الوحيد عندي الذي يحمل إقامة طويلة بالمكان هو نص الإمارات – في الكتاب الأخير وكتبته بعد إقامة ثلاثة أشهر – فاذا كتب نص بيروت بعد سنتين من الإقامة مثلاً فلن يحمل هذا الدرجة من الاحتفاء بالمكان وهذا البريق الذي يحمله المكان الجديد، بالتأكيد سيخرج كتابة أخرى، ولكنها مختلفة تماماً.
تحدثت عن «الهوية» فما الذي تقصده؟
منذ ان تولد وانت تحمل هاجس المكان الآخر، فأنت تعرف انك في الجزء الأقل من العالم فهناك بلاد أجمل وأحسن من مصر. وأعتقد أن الهدف الاهم الذي أسعى اليه هو ان تشعر بأنك ند لأي «آخر»، فلن تكون انساناً وانت تحمل احساساً بالدونية. وعقب احداث مباراة «أم درمان» بين مصر والجزائر برز هذا الإحساس بالدونية إلى السطح على سبيل المثال.
فموضوع الهوية ضاغط وحاضر عندي واعتقد انه سيكون موجوداً في أي كتابة عندي. ربما لو كنت انكليزياً او اميركياً لم اكن سأنشغل بمسألة الهوية هذه اظن ان هناك ظرفاً تاريخياً يجعل موضوع الهوية مطروحاً عليك طوال الوقت فأنت مواجه بانك في مزبلة العالم.
ومن ناحية أخرى خلال كتبي الثلاثة ثمة مصري يقارن نفسه كعربي بعربي آخر. وليس المصري بشكل عام في أي مكان. ويكتشف أننا لسنا متشابهين ولا نتكلم جميعاً اللغة نفسها. فالموضوع في احد مستوياته متعلق بدحض الشوفينية المصرية – الغريبة أحياناً – فثمة فكرة عند المصريين أنهم مفهومون في حين بقية اللهجات غير مفهومة. مع ان الواقعي ان بقية العرب لا يفهمون كل العامية المصرية بالضبط كما لا نفهم نحن المصريين كل العامية التونسية او اللبنانية. أجل ثمة حالة من التعايش مع العامية المصرية الشبيهة «بالتلفزيون»، ولكن في الحقيقة انت غير مفهوم بالشكل الذي تتصوره.
ولكن هذا الهاجس لم يتواجد في فترة الدراسة في انكلترا؟
أنا غير مشغول بالغرب على الإطلاق كموضوع كتابة. وهذا ما جعلتني رحلة بيروت وما تلاها اكتشفه. فتصور الحياة في العالم «الافضل» انكسر عندي مبكراً فلقد سافرت الى اوروبا وأنا في السابعة عشرة. فتفكك عندي هذا الوهم منذ البداية بالإضافة إلى عدم فضولي لمشاهدة اوروبا. بالنسبة لي أفضل الذهاب الى بورما او نامبيا أفضل من فينا بالنسبة لي. هذا السياق يثيرني أكثر وأجد أشياء كثيرة لأقولها مرتبطة بهذا السياق.
وبالتالي البحث الذي أجده أكثر فائدة بالنسبة لي وعلى المستوى الاجتماعي المعاصر هو البحث في معنى كونك عربياً أو مسلماً معاصراً.
الهوية بالايجاب وليس بالسلب ان ترى نفسك مساوياً للآخرين لست أقل ولست أعلى. ليس بالتغني بجمال الآخر او بمهاجمته بدون معنى. ان تتعاطى مع الشروط المعاصرة التي هي بالضرورة ناشئة نتيجة علاقاتك المتعددة المستويات بهذا الآخر. وان تنشغل بأسئلتك الخاصة وليس بمقارنات مع الآخرين.
هل لديك خطط جديدة للكتابة عن مدن أخرى؟
لا اريد التوقف عن المدن العربية، ولكن أشعر أني اكتفيت من الكتابة بهذا الشكل وتحديداً في نص أبو ظبي. لن أقدم فيه جديداً بعد ذلك. ستتحول بعد ذلك الى تكرار وتعمّد بدون أي إضافة لا يعــني ذلك اني سأتوقف عن الكتابة عن المدن، ولكن ليس بهذا الـــشكل ولا أعــرف أيضا بأي شكل.
وأشعر أن نصوص «شمال القاهرة غرب الفلبين» ربما لم تحمل الحالة نفسها التي كتب بها الكتابان السابقان فهي نصوص كتبت لأسباب مختلفة وبشروط مختلفة لكتبي السابقة. والغريب بالنسبة لي أن أكثر ما كتب كان عن الكتاب الأخير، ربما لانه جاء بعد تراكم جذب الانتباه إلى هذا الشكل الكتابي. الآن هناك عملية كتابة جديدة تحدث ولكن على مستوى خيالى في الرواية التي أعكف الآن على كتابتها تحت عنوان «الطغري»، وهي حكاية خيالية غير واقعية او غير عقلانية وتدور أيضاً داخل مدينة هي القاهرة. والفرق بينه وبين كتبي السابقة هو وجود حدوتة لا معقولة تتركب عليها الأحداث.
الانفجار الروائي
كنت تريد الخروج من فكرة التجنيس الأدبي، والآن تكتب رواية. ولكن ألم تفكر بعد «بيروت شي محل» كتابة رواية؟
لا لم أفكر.. وأكثر ما يسبب لي ألفة في كتابة «الطغري»، هو أنها ايضاً خارجة عن الرواية الكلاسيكية، ومرتبطة أكثر بالكتب التجمعية الشهيرة في التراث العربي مثل «المستطرف». بالتأكيد ليس بهذا الحجم ولكنها تحمل بشكل ما هذه الصفة «الموسوعية»، محاولة كم وضع كبير من المعلومات حول شخص في سياق أدبي ما. وأيضاً لها علاقة بطريقة كتابة التاريخ عند الجبرتي وأبن أياس. وهذا يشعرني بشكل ما بعلاقة مع هذا التراث العربي – الذي لم يكن يضم الرواية بالمناسبة – أكثر من علاقتي بالكثير مما يكتب تحت اسم الرواية العربية الجديدة.
تحدثت عن الانفجارالروائي والرواية الجديدة… كيف ترى هذه المقولات؟
أكثر ما يكتب على انه «رواية» قد خلقت بالتالي هذه الحالة من «الانفجار الروائي» الذي يتحدثون عنه منذ سنين لا تمتّ للجنس الروائي بصلة. ما أقصده أن الجنس الروائي في العالم له علاقة بالحكي واللاواقعية.
فالروية بشكل ما هي نتاج البرجوازية الاوروبية في القرن التاسع عشر والتي كانت تكتب في كتب كبيرة الحجم لطبقة معينة عن طبقة أخرى. في ظل عدم وجود وسائل تسلية أخرى مثل التلفزيون. الا استثناءات يكون فيها الكاتب مخبولاً مثل ديستويفسكي على سبيل المثال.
فلكي تخلق علاقة بهذا الجنس الأدبي بالتأكيد ان تحتاج الى هو اكثر واعمق من أن تكتب قصة قصيرة طويلة بعض الشيء ثم تضع على غلافها كلمة رواية. او ان تكتب سيرتك الذاتية او اعترافاتك وتضع عليها رواية أيضاً.
انا مع تسمية كتابة مثل «عزازيل» او «عمارة يعقوبيان» رواية بغض النظر عن رأيك في هذه الكتابة. ولكن كتاب علاء خالد الأخير على سبيل المثال وهو كتاب جميل وأمتعني كثيراً ولكنه ليس رواية.
ولا يوجد أي مجهود حقيقي نقدي أو غير نقدي في تعريف ما هي «الرواية العربية» على الإطلاق، لو لدينا خطاب نقدي مسؤول لوجه اهتمامه لحركة الشعر في التسعينيات.
الانفجار لم يكن روائياً ولكن في كتابات أطلق عليها روايات، والرواية مجرد شكل من اشكال النشر. مع وجود حقيقة عالمية تؤكد ان الرواية تحقق حالة من المتابعة والاكتفاء والتشبع بالنسبة للقارئ، ولذلك مبيعات الرواية في العالم كله أكثر من الشعر او القصة القصيرة.
والنقد الغائب…
جزء من كوني ضد فكرة تسامي النص الأدبي على بقية ايضاً كوني لست مشغولا بالبكاء على النقد فلديّ الكثير من المصائب ولا احب الكتابة الاكاديمية بشكل عام. واعتقد ان النقاد لدينا الذين يملتكون ادوات نقدية تمكنهم من ممارسة هذا الفعل توقفت أذهانهم عند الستينيات.
ولا توجد متابعة تفاعلية حقيقة لما يكتب. فجزء من النقد ومن القراءة الحقيقية ان تتـفاعل مع ما تقرأ، وهذا لا يحدث.
لكن لماذا لا يفرز كل جيل نقاده كما يخرج مبدعينه؟
يمكن تفسير ذلك باسباب أكثر ابرزها ان النظام التعليمي السائد في مصر لا يساعد على خلق هذه العقلية النقدية. في النهاية المبدع قادر على ان يعلم نفسه. اعتقد النقد يحتاج بشكل ما او بآخر الى منهجية معينة بعيداً عن استقرارك على هذه المنهجية ام لا ولكن بالأساس يجب أن توجد هذه الآلية. هذا يعني بشكل آخر نظاماً تعليمياً وهذا ما اعرف انه يجري في جامعات أوروبية واميركية حيث ينتجون نقداً وليس مجرد متابعات.
الى جانب سؤال آخر هو كم الكتابات الموجود حالياً من اجل من ومن يقرأها؟؟ وهو سؤال له مستويات كثيرة ولكن يبقى المستوى الأهم هو مستوى العلاقة مع المجتمع بمفهومه الواسع فأنت في النهاية ومع كل هذا الضجيج أشبه بمن يطبع منشورات سرية

Reblog this post [with Zemanta]

Sound and vision

Oud for thought: Moroccan Tariq Banzi travelled from America to play at the Cultural Foundation. Nicole Hill / The National

Time stopped at Cassells hotel in Abu Dhabi on Friday. It was a fleeting impression, but haunting. The photographer had positioned the three musicians in dramatic formation on the stairs to shoot them with their instruments: Tarek Banzi hugging an Iraqi-made oud; Julia Banzi flaunting a stately flamenco guitar; and Charlie Bisharat balancing the smallest instrument yet, a violin, on his shoulder.

Thus arrayed while the camera click-clicked, occasionally pitting its flash against the sunlit window to one side, the three musicians started, reflexively, indolently, to play. It happened without so much as a nod to each other, evidently without thinking: the auditory equivalent of doodling, but with three distinct hands on the same scrap of paper. And while it lasted, in a very real way, time stopped.

Time was to stop for much longer the following night at the Cultural Foundation’s Dhafra Theatre. The trio presented what Julia called “a half programme”. Their concerts are always part heritage, part original composition, she explained, and their repertoire is likewise “50-50”. Saturday evening’s eight pieces included traditional Andalusi and flamenco numbers from Tétouan and Granada, respectively, as well as new compositions and improvisations. Given the lack of publicity and the last-minute confusion as to which troupe was to perform at what time, the auditorium was impressively full.

People were pleasantly jolted by the sound of Arab and European traditions being woven together, seamlessly, right there before their eyes. And it was as if the clash of civilisations had been resolved more than 1,000 years ago. You felt like saying, “Take that, Samuel Huntington!”

Time stopped, you realise now, because different styles working so beautifully together have a disorienting effect. You could hardly associate the almost physical excitement of flamenco with the rhythmic melancholy of the oud. Nor, in the middle of attempting to tell the two apart, would you expect to hear the flowing, nostalgic sound of a kamanjah, the Arabic word for fiddle tuned, like European strings, to omit quarter tones. “What we’re doing,” Julia had announced on the phone, “connects well with people. It’s fresh, it’s exciting. Young people really connect with it. Young people from all over the world.”

But even Julia’s words could not prefigure the experience of contemporary Andalusian – the term the Banzis coined to brand the music of their Al Andalus Ensemble, founded in 1987 – which, even for a few impromptu moments on a hotel stairway in Abu Dhabi, proves deeply unsettling.

On that same day, in the kind of gangsta voice that Arabs who immigrate to America tend to acquire, Tarek explained that he played many instruments. Tétouan, where he grew up, is “the most authentic” centre for Andalusi, the quarter tone-less (hence harmonic) Arab musical tradition which originated in Al Andalus. He grew up immersed in Andalusi and, thanks to his mother being a Darqawi dervish, in the percussive chanting of the Sufis as well. But he never let any of it tie him down. “I just, you know, have to feel it.”

At the concert Tarek would demonstrate just how freely he relates to music and how versatile his technical skill is with ney and darbuka (tabla) solos: the reed flute and the hand-tapped drum, which he played, anachronistically, like a banjo. “Actually the oud I didn’t really study seriously,” he explained, “because I was into western music… Rock, pop – all kinds. Since I was a kid,” he revealed, “I started making my own instruments.” As a fine-arts student, painter and amateur flamenco and jazz musician – today Tarek is also a professional graphic designer – he spent 10 years in Madrid after finishing his education at the Tétouan Fine Arts School, practically the only institution of its kind in Morocco in the early 1970s. By the mid-1980s he had met Julia, one of a handful of female flamenco guitarists worldwide, and they now live in Portland, Oregon.

Like Gibraltar, Tarek is named after the Berber hero Tarek ibn Ziyad, who, servicing the Ummayid government in exile, led the first Muslim army into Spain. The Banzis – a well established Spanish Arab family from Granada – fled the Reconquest back into Morocco. Yet Tarek is adamantly against exclusive cultural allegiances. “I think that I belong to this little globe where we are,” he said, his tone bordering on exasperation. “And there are these huge monotheistic religions and you have to respect all of them because there are so many people in each. You have to respect these people.”

At this point the default De Niro cool comes back, “so the only way we can do something is to try and create this peace between them”. “Music,” he enunciated, “I think it does create understanding.”

The most convincing part of which argument is, of course, the music itself. Contemporary Andalusian works by disrupting expectations, forcing people to realise that legacies overlap. By fusing Andalusi with flamenco (through which the Banzis have pursued the Roma and Indian connections as well), by resuscitating the Judaeo-Spanish (Ladino) tradition – the music played wherever communities of Sephardim survived the Inquisition from the 15th century onwards – as well as the Cantigas of Santa Maria, their music points up what is shared. Where bridges of understanding are concerned, it excavates instead of constructing.

“You might guess that it’s not an easy time to be an Arab in America,” Julia said on the phone. “So that’s part of what we’re trying to do in the group: to break down Arab prejudices in America, and hopefully break down American prejudices in the Arab world.”

Charlie Bisharat, a Grammy award winning violinist whose credits include accompanying Yanni, Elton John and The Rolling Stones, agrees: “If we concentrated more on bringing music to different parts of the world from different cultures we wouldn’t have so much time to think about killing each other.” For Charlie, playing with the Banzis was “a kind of reunion,” but being half-Lebanese – a different kind of Arab American from Tarek – he fully appreciates Al Andalus’s message. Contemporary Andalusian is certainly different but, he said, “I love that stuff.”

The uninitiated might identify it as Arab, Latin or chamber music. Taste and predisposition, or else – to borrow the title of the group’s latest CD – Genetic Memories, will determine which. To the uninitiated, it may seem miraculous that no jarring or discomfort occurs. But the miracle – the Ornament of the World, as Maria Rosa Menocal called it – is medieval Spain, Al Andalus, which from 711 to 1492 pooled Arab, Berber, Sephardi and Castilian genes to constitute an early, long lived and in some sense exemplary multicultural society.

Back in the Arabian Peninsula, between Damascus and Baghdad, the Abbassids had massacred the first Muslim dynasty down to the last man – almost. Thanks to a single escaped emir, Abdurrahman, who managed to establish a power base not far from where Tarek was born, the first continuous eight centuries of all but perfect intermingling of East and West in human history occurred in North Africa and the Iberian Peninsula. But unlike the meeting of East and West in Malta, for example, language did not mix so well; it takes a linguist to point out the extent of Arabic influence on Spanish. With music it simply takes a receptive pair of ears. And that is why the experience of the music of Al Andalus is a bit like a monolingual Arab or his Italian counterpart hearing Maltese for the first time: it sounds simultaneously foreign and familiar, suggesting something beyond him, and yet he can understand it almost perfectly.

Reblog this post [with Zemanta]